Nuremberg Courtroom 600: Where World War II Ended [Guest Post]

Nuremberg CR 600 For Eugene Kordahl Guest Blog Post 02 24 15

By Eugene B. Kordahl[1]

Why Visit Courtroom 600?

Why would a Court Watcher be interested in visiting the famous Nuremberg Palace of Justice’s courtroom 600? Because it was here that, after World War II ended, Nazi war criminals were brought to justice in dramatic trials held by Allied military tribunals.

13 major trials of alleged war criminals were held in courtroom 600 between November 20, 1945 and October 1, 1949, and had we at Court Watch NOLA been around at the time, our eyes and ears would have been full of untold astounding facts, exhibits, and statements. Continue reading

Is N.O. Still “Among the Worst” for Brady Violations?

The New York Times recently cited New Orleans (under a previous D.A.) as “among the worst” when it comes to prosecutors refusing to share case evidence with defendants. And the news that the trial of Trung Le, who is accused of the 2014 Bourbon Street shooting, will be delayed because the state won’t share its witness list with Mr. Le’s attorney shows that this debate continues. Continue reading

CWN Welcomes Judge Williams to Criminal District Court

Congratulations to Judge Byron Williams, Criminal District Court Section G, who took the bench for the first time this morning. As the newest CDC Judge, he’ll be presiding over one of the attic courtrooms (with Sections A, F, and L also playing a game of musical chairs). Judge Williams was apparently eager to get started, beginning Court this morning at 8:15 on the dot. Continue reading

A Remarkable Year

Friends and Supporters,

None of us want to return to the time when local government was ignored, unaccountable, and often ineffective.

Fortunately, since 2007 Court Watch NOLA’s vigilance has made New Orleans’ criminal courts more timely, professional, and efficient. The courtroom presence of CWN’s dedicated volunteers forces judges to start court on time, encourages professionalism, and saves taxpayers time and money by significantly reducing courthouse delays. These are factors that help ensure a transparent and fair system for everyone — victims, witnesses, defendants, family members, testifying police officers, and jurors. Continue reading

Judicial Runoffs on Saturday, Dec. 6!

Saturday is election day, so don’t forget to vote! In addition to the U.S. Senate and Public Service Commission races, Orleans Parish will vote on two judicial races. So now’s the time to do your research: Janet Ahern and Monique Barial are facing off for a family court judgeship, while Freddie Charbonnet and Desiree Cook-Calvin are competing for a juvenile court seat. Mr. Charbonnet and Ms. Cook-Calvin both participated in the Judicial Candidates Forum co-sponsored by Court Watch NOLA in October, so check it out on YouTube to learn more about them. 

Continue reading

Criminal Justice Budgeting Season: Something’s Gotta Give

It’s everybody’s favorite time of year – when criminal justice leaders hope that the Mayor and City Council will leave a blank check in each of their stockings. Now that the city budget has stabilized after years of deficits, virtually every single criminal justice agency is begging for more money than the Mayor is proposing. Here’s the list (the dollar amount is not their total budget – it’s how much more they want over and above what the Mayor is proposing):

Continue reading

Criminal District Court Election Results

Congratulations to Judge Marullo on his re-election, and to Judge-Elect Williams on his win in the November 4 election. While the courts cleared the way for Judge Marullo to run for re-election despite the constitution’s mandatory judicial retirement age, whether he can actually take office is an open question. Judge-Elect Williams, meanwhile, will take over the Section G docket in January, and our court watchers are looking forward to getting to know him.

Continue reading